Mapping Digital Media

Mapping Digital Media: Case Studies from Moldova and Macedonia

OSF’s Mapping Digital Media project examines the opportunities and risks created by the transition from traditional to digital media in 60 countries. The project explores how these changes affect the core democratic function of any media system: providing the public with news about political, economic, and social affairs.
The presentation will briefly introduce the range and methodology of the research project, and present the findings of the first reports completed – highlighting the examples of Moldova and Macedonia. Emphasis will be laid on the effects of digitalization on journalism and the changes in media usage and consumption patterns. In addition some detailed aspects additionally covered by the Digital Media Project will be dealt with, i.e. impact on traditional media and new business models, investigative journalism in the web, the role of mobile technology, etc. Continue reading

Digital Investigative Journalism

Digital Investigative Journalism

The traditional media industry is rapidly changing in western and in developing and transitional countries. In the northern hemisphere models like Pro Publica are still more or less unique. In Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America exists a longer tradition of civil societal organizations and NGO’s, providing an online-driven investigative journalism. Very often they publish their content in own Internet forums and ‘stakeholder’-media. Those organizations provide investigations which the traditional media aren’t capable of achieving and financing anymore. For them the digital media is both a tool for editorial management and publishing their investigations. Normally those organizations are supported either by foreign governmental agencies or foreign private foundations. Very rarely their business model works in a sustainable manner. Continue reading

Data Journalism

Data Journalism

Data is playing an increasingly important role in our digital age. Not only the debate around Wikileaks has brought up the question what role journalists play in the creation of transparency and accountability. With the growth of movements for open government and open data, new possibilities and challenges are opening up (not only) for journalists interested to work with open data as a source. Continue reading

Mobile Journalism

Mobile Journalism

The mobile phone may be the one most powerful tool or technology in developing countries today. This session will focus on the topic of mobile technologies for media development and examine how is mobile telephony impacting on media and journalism directly? Two speakers are invited to highlight two aspects of mobile reporting: the gathering and dissemination of information. Continue reading

New Media, New Partnerships?

New Media, New Partnerships?

Citizen Journalists, in particular political Bloggers, are playing an increasingly influential role as opinion shapers and information suppliers in a number of countries. In particular in countries lacking pluralistic and independent media structures, citizen journalists often use the Internet to express opinions who are not voiced in other public media. The group of bloggers who created Ushahidi in Kenya, the regime critical Egyptian and Tunisian Bloggers are just the more prominent examples.

But with everybody being a journalist, the providers of infrastructure and the mere communication networks (i.e. telecom companies) become more important than the traditional broadcasting organizations. Continue reading

Security Threats in the Digital Era

Security in the Digital Era

What threats do media organizations and journalists working online need to be aware of and how can they protect themselves? Social Media has become a new outlet for political protest and mobilization against combat governmental suppression. The revolutions in North Africa and the Middle East have shown that state censorship can be circumvented and that the Internet can be a driving force for democratic movements. Continue reading

A Sneak Preview: The Future of Technology and Media in Development

A Sneak Preview: The Future of Technology and Media in Development

Infrastructure and lack of connectivity are often considered the main problems in developing countries when it comes to using new media. With the mobile revolution and backbone development taking place, this situation may soon be improving significantly.

In this final session, we will attempt a view into the future: What are the trends and visions for connectivity in developing countries and what will be their impact on journalism? The session starts with a brief overview of the recent developments in Internet Infrastructure and mobile Internet in Africa and continue to predict how the situation may evolve over the next five years. Continue reading